VELCADE® (bortezomib) FOR INJECTION

NINLARO® (ixazomib) capsules 4mg I 3mg I 2.3mg

About your treatment

Let's talk about a therapy that has been shown to help.

How VELCADE® (bortezomib) works

VELCADE (bortezomib) is a type of chemotherapy called a targeted therapy.

VELCADE belongs to a class of medicines called proteasome inhibitors. It is approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. VELCADE has been studied in many important clinical trials. It has been studied in a wide range of people, including those with renal impairment and diabetes.

As a targeted therapy, VELCADE works by blocking or slowing down the action of proteasomes inside cells. The function of proteasomes is to break down proteins in both healthy and cancerous cells.

Illustration of a myeloma cell

Myeloma cell

  • Proteasomes are inside cells
  • They act like garbage disposals, digesting unneeded or damaged proteins within cells
  • Myeloma cells are more dependent on proteasomes than normal cells
Illustration of VELCADE entering a myeloma cell

Enter VELCADE

  • It targets the proteasomes inside cells, slowing down or blocking the proteasomes from digesting and discarding the proteins within cells
Illustration of cell death

Cell death

  • As the proteasome is unable to digest the additional proteins within cells, a buildup of proteins develops
  • The buildup of proteins within cells can lead to cell death
Legend: myeloma cell, protein, VELCADE, proteasome, digested protein

How VELCADE is given

VELCADE is given in 1 of 2 ways

VELCADE is an injection that is given intravenously (into your vein) or subcutaneously (under your skin) by a healthcare professional.

VELCADE is usually given in a doctor’s office or at a clinic 1 or 2 times per week.

How VELCADE fits into your calendar

VELCADE is given in cycles

  • A cycle includes the number of weeks you receive a drug, and the time spent resting and not receiving the drug
  • The length of treatment and the number of cycles depend on your treatment goals and how well you feel

You and your doctor will discuss your treatment plan. You’ll also discuss which way of receiving VELCADE—subcutaneously or intravenously—is best for you. The schedule and dose are the same for both.

Click here for tools to help you get the most out of VELCADE.

As initial treatment for multiple myeloma

How VELCADE treatment is scheduled over 1 year

VELCADE is given twice weekly, then once weekly

First 6 months—twice-weekly doses

  • VELCADE is given twice a week for 2 weeks, followed by a 10-day rest period
  • This sequence is then repeated to make one 6-week cycle
  • There are 4 cycles in the first treatment phase
Treatment schedule for VELCADE (multiple myeloma): calendars showing cycles 1-4 and next 6 months, cycles 5-9
Treatment schedule for VELCADE (multiple myeloma): calendars showing cycles 1-4 and next 6 months, cycles 5-9
  • VELCADE is given once a week for 2 weeks, followed by a 13-day rest period
  • This sequence is then repeated to make one 6-week cycle
  • There are 5 cycles in the second treatment phase

You must wait at least 3 days between VELCADE doses. Two drugs called melphalan and prednisone (MP) are also taken on the first 4 days of every cycle throughout the year.

In a study, half of the people taking VELCADE-based therapy stayed on VELCADE for at least 50 weeks out of a planned 54 weeks

As initial treatment for mantle cell lymphoma

VELCADE is given intravenously twice a week for 2 weeks followed by a 10-day rest period. This can be repeated for up to 6 cycles

  • For people who see a response at week 18 (6 cycles), an additional 6 weeks of treatment is recommended (2 additional cycles)

In a clinical trial, VELCADE was given according to this schedule:

Treatment schedule for VELCADE (mantle cell lymphoma): twice weekly, 6-8 cycles
  • It’s important to take treatment as prescribed by your healthcare team and discuss any side effects with them. There are many things to consider when choosing a treatment plan that’s right for you
  • 8% of people stopped treatment due to side effects

You must wait at least 3 days between VELCADE doses.

Benefits of VELCADE in previously
untreated multiple myeloma

With 1 year of therapy

Shown to help people with previously untreated multiple myeloma live longer

  • In a study, VELCADE was given with 2 drugs, melphalan and prednisone (MP), and was compared with MP alone
  • 682 people with multiple myeloma who had never been treated before and were not eligible for a stem cell transplant participated, with a median follow-up of 5 years
  • The study included a wide range of people, including those with renal (kidney) impairment and/or diabetes
  • The 5-year evaluation showed that people who received VELCADE plus MP lived longer than people who received MP alone (56.4 months versus 43.1 months)
  • Half of the people on VELCADE-based therapy continued to receive VELCADE for 50 weeks out of a planned 54 weeks
  • 69% of people responded with VELCADE-based therapy. 30% achieved a complete response
  • 28% of people achieving a complete response did so after 24 weeks of therapy

With VELCADE, you might get your best response later in treatment

VELCADE was the first-ever treatment of its kind, called a proteasome inhibitor, specifically approved for multiple myeloma.

  • In this study of VELCADE, in previously untreated people, some people had their best response as early as 6 weeks. Others continued to respond after 6 months of treatment. If you don’t respond early, don’t be discouraged
  • It’s important to stick with your treatment plan if you and your doctor decide it’s right for you
  • The most common side effects reported by people receiving VELCADE in this study included abnormal blood cell counts; numbness, tingling, burning, or weakness in hands or feet; nausea; diarrhea; and nerve pain
  • VELCADE can cause serious side effects, including peripheral neuropathy (tingling or numbness in the hands, arms, feet, or legs that can progress to discomfort, pain, muscle weakness, or a burning sensation), low blood pressure, heart problems, lung problems, liver problems, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES; symptoms may include headache, nausea, mental and visual effects), gastrointestinal (abdominal) problems, neutropenia (low levels of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell), thrombocytopenia (low levels of platelets), and tumor lysis syndrome (TLS; complications resulting from cancer or its treatment)

Achieving a response is a good reason to continue on VELCADE

  • Some people think about stopping VELCADE when they are feeling better
  • According to the study mentioned above, people who stayed on VELCADE for about 1 year lived longer than people who did not receive a VELCADE-based regimen

Benefits of VELCADE in mantle cell lymphoma

Shown to give people with previously untreated mantle cell lymphoma more time without their disease progressing

VELCADE was the first-ever treatment of its kind, called a proteasome inhibitor, specifically approved for mantle cell lymphoma.

  • In a clinical trial, people with mantle cell lymphoma received either VELCADE or vincristine along with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone
  • 487 people with previously untreated mantle cell lymphoma who were not eligible or considered for a bone marrow transplant participated
  • The study included a wide range of people, including those with renal (kidney) impairment

In a study of people with mantle cell lymphoma who had not been treated before, for people who received the VELCADE-based treatment,* their mantle cell lymphoma did not worsen for a median of 25 months compared with 14 months for people who received non-VELCADE-based treatment.

*VELCADE+rituximab+cyclophosphamide+doxorubicin+prednisone.
Rituximab+cyclophosphamide+doxorubicin+vincristine+prednisone.

In this clinical trial, the most commonly reported side effects in people receiving the VELCADE-based regimen included abnormal blood cell counts (neutropenia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, or lymphopenia); numbness, tingling, burning, or weakness in hands or feet (peripheral neuropathy); diarrhea; nausea; and fever.

For more information on mantle cell lymphoma,
click here.

VELCADE frequently asked questions

If I have multiple myeloma, can I receive VELCADE after a stem cell transplant?

Yes. The FDA has approved VELCADE for people with newly diagnosed as well as relapsed multiple myeloma, including people who previously received VELCADE. The clinical trial included people who had received a stem cell transplant. Talk with your doctor or healthcare team about whether VELCADE may be right for you.

VELCADE is also approved as an initial treatment for people with previously untreated multiple myeloma.

How often should I receive VELCADE?

Your treatment schedule will vary depending on your diagnosis and treatment regimen.

Learn more about receiving
VELCADE.
How long should I take VELCADE if I have previously untreated multiple myeloma?

VELCADE treatment is scheduled for the duration of 1 year

VELCADE is given twice weekly followed by once-weekly dosing

First 6 months—Twice-weekly doses

  • VELCADE is given twice a week for 2 weeks, followed by a 10-day rest period
  • This sequence is then repeated to make one 6-week cycle
  • There are 4 cycles in the first treatment phase
Treatment schedule for VELCADE (multiple myeloma): calendars showing cycles 1-4 and next 6 months, cycles 5-9
Treatment schedule for VELCADE (multiple myeloma): calendars showing cycles 1-4 and next 6 months, cycles 5-9
  • VELCADE is given once a week for 2 weeks, followed by a 13-day rest period
  • This sequence is then repeated to make one 6-week cycle
  • There are 5 cycles in the second treatment phase

You must wait at least 3 days between VELCADE doses. Two drugs called melphalan and prednisone (MP) are also taken on the first 4 days of every cycle throughout the year.

In a study, half of the people on VELCADE-based therapy continued to receive VELCADE for at least 50 weeks out of a planned 54 weeks.

Learn more.

Are you familiar with your options? If you’ve had 1 prior treatment for multiple myeloma and would prefer an oral option, click here.

How long should I take VELCADE if I have mantle cell lymphoma and have never been treated before?

Previously untreated mantle cell lymphoma

VELCADE is given twice a week for 2 weeks followed by a 10-day rest period. This can be repeated up to 6 times.

In a clinical trial, VELCADE was given according to this schedule:

Treatment schedule for VELCADE (mantle cell lymphoma): twice weekly, 6-8 cycles
  • For people who achieve a response at week 18 (cycle 6), an additional 6 weeks (2 cycles) of treatment is recommended
  • It’s important to take treatment as prescribed by your healthcare team and discuss any side effects with them. There are many things to consider when choosing a treatment plan that’s right for you
  • 8% of people stopped treatment due to side effects

You must wait at least 3 days between VELCADE doses.

Is there support to help me understand the costs of VELCADE?

The VELCADE Reimbursement Assistance Program (VRAP) is a support program of Takeda Oncology Here2Assist™, a program that offers personal support and financial resources through a dedicated case manager.

If you don’t have insurance coverage for VELCADE, you may be eligible for the VELCADE Patient Assistance Program. If you qualify, your VELCADE will be delivered without charge to your physician. For more information or to enroll, contact a VELCADE case manager.

VELCADE Reimbursement Assistance Program (VRAP)

1-866-VELCADE (835-2233)1-866-VELCADE (835-2233); select option 2
8AM to 8PM (ET), Monday through Friday